About

Published on November th, 2010

The MacGuffin Men is a podcast and blog that hopes to add some depth to what we feel is lacking in film and pop culture criticism. Both the podcast and blog will focus mostly on movies, but we will occasionally stray into other topics like music, social media, and sports. Yes, sports. Deal with it. This website/blog/Twitter feed/cultural phenomenon/sexual revolution is operated by two separate yet equally important individuals: Alex and James.

Alex discovered his love of movies early in life and spent much of his formative years in the theatre. He is a particular fan of teen movies, the action genre, sports films and the canon of Steven Seagal. He enjoys documentaries, has a good eye for cinematography, appreciates Terrence Malick, digs Transformers and likes the fact Uwe Boll exists despite liking none of his work. Outside of films he is a well-researched hip-hop expert, avid basketball fan, frequent participant in telling James to watch The Wire already, graphic novel reader, and videogame player. He knows if Deckard was a replicant or not, but he doesn’t make a big deal about it. Alex’s proudest academic achievement is figuring out how to write undergrad essays about Jay-Z, BioShock, Ghost World, The Band, Blade Runner, Saturday Night Live, NBA 2K9, Joy Division, Martin Scorsese and Michael Bay in the span of a single calendar year.

James’ introduction to cinema was through comedies that were as funny as they were wildly inappropriate for a child his age. His initial appreciation for comedies started with works like Quest for the Holy Grail and Three Amigos, and has developed to include a span from Charlie Chaplin to Sacha Baron Cohen. While he also enjoys stand-up and sketch comedy, he spends his non-loltimes appreciating westerns, the Coen brothers, soccer and, inexplicably, Geena Davis. He would think Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus is awesome without even seeing it but, having seen it, knows that it’s actually life-changing.  He also briefly claimed to dislike hipsters before it was cool but then thought that sounded too hipstery, so he took it back. His education in the vague yet intellectual sounding Media, Information and Technoculture makes certain that no matter how insightful anything he says is, there is no way it has any practical value. If he’s lucky it will be abstract and profound, but it will always be useless.